Misconceptions About Low-Nicotine Cigarettes Do Not Lessen the Benefits

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has begun addressing the nicotine levels in cigarettes and have plans for starting a public dialogue to lower them to non-addictive levels.

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It seems that the smokers perceive low-nicotine cigarettes as safer, mainly because they think that as the level of nicotine grows so do the smoking related illnesses. This is a big misconception although it does not change the possible benefits of low-nicotine cigarettes, according to the new study.

The truth is that nicotine on its own does not lead to health conditions that are related to smoking. Nicotine’s role in the cigarettes is the making the smoker addicted to smoking but health problems are caused by other substances and additives in the cigarettes.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has begun addressing the nicotine levels in cigarettes and have plans for starting a public dialogue to lower them to non-addictive levels. According to some experts, though, this may not go as planned. According to Lauren Pacek, of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, people might be less likely to quit smoking if they think that low-level cigarettes are safer.

Pacek also commented: “On the positive side, we found perceived nicotine content wasn’t associated with smoking behavior.” This was related to the fact that smokers still had the desire to quit smoking regardless of what they believed about low-nicotine cigarettes.

The findings are pulled from the study done in 2015 in which the results showed how people who smoked low-level nicotine cigarettes were smoking a lot less and overall had less exposure to nicotine.

The study participants did not know what is the nicotine content of the cigarettes they were smoking and at the end of the research, about 34% actually thought that they were smoking cigarettes with less nicotine content.

When doing a survey at the end of their study, Pacek and her colleagues actually found out that the study participant believed that the health risks grew significantly with the increase of nicotine levels. However, even if they thought they were smoking ‘less harmful’ cigarettes, they still were more likely to want to stop smoking within one year compared to those who were smoking regular cigarettes with standard levels of nicotine.

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